Journey to Rabbit Island

After being back at work for a couple of weeks, my girlfriend and I took a day trip to Ōkunoshima, also know as “Rabbit Island”. Located between Kure and Mihara, you have to take a 10 minute ferry trip from Tadanoumi to the island. Ōkunoshima has become increasingly popular over the last five years with the help of social media. My Facebook page is constantly being littered with the likes of BuzzFeed and other similar sites showcasing the “cuteness of Rabbit Island”. With it being in the same prefecture as us, we bought our lunches at the convenience store, along with cabbage and carrots for the rabbit, and headed there. Continue reading “Journey to Rabbit Island”

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Best Indian Curry in Japan….so far.

“What popular foods does the UK have?”, asks the same teacher every month. And I always respond with “Fish and Chips, Roast Beef and Indian Curry”. Curry has become a quintessential dish for British people stemming back to the 1800s. In fact, Chicken Tikka Masala has been labelled as “a true British national dish” by many with its origins in Glasgow. Strangely, I didn’t really enjoy spicy food until I was about fifteen. Some would call it blaspheme especially since my birthplace has the title of 2016’s Curry Capital of the UK. Takeout nights would be a pain for Dad, as he’d have to make two stops; The Bharat for curry and Casa Pizza for my solitary pizza. But now Indian food is one of my favourite cuisines.

Continue reading “Best Indian Curry in Japan….so far.”

……Damn Jet Lag

I’m currently writing this at four o’clock in the morning with the sun yet to rise. I got back from a three-week vacation last Wednesday and the jet lag has unfortunately set in. As I’m not blessed with the ability to sleep on planes, the eight hour difference between the UK and Japan was been made even worse. Adapting to UK time wasn’t a problem three weeks ago. But getting reaccustomed to Japan Time has been increasingly frustrating. I just about managed four hours of sleep yesterday, but it’s still been a stressful mess.

A friend once stated that the general rule of thumb is that for each hour of time difference between destination and starting point, that will roughly correlate to the number of days required to get over the jet lag. Well, it’s been nearly a week and while it’s certainly getting better, it ain’t over yet. School starts this Friday, so I shouldn’t have any trouble getting up. But whether I’ll be able to stay awake in class is the real question. We’ll just have to wait and see.

The “Kiwi Brothers” take Japan

Go into any Japanese supermarket’s “Fruit and Vegetable” section and I guarantee that you’ll find a stack of kiwifruits larger than that of cherries, apples and oranges combined. Over the last couple of years overall fruit sales have fallen by 10% in Japan. But according to the Fresh Fruit Portal, kiwifruit sales have grown by a third in two seasons. In fact the Japanese market accounts for 16% of global sales.

In Japan, fruit isn’t cheap. It’s actually a bloody ripoff. A single apple can cost anywhere from 150 yen (£1.02) to 400 yen (£2.72). Meanwhile a decent melon can cost up to 3000 yen (£20) and even higher. But do these steep prices account for a tastier fruit? Not really, and that’s why many Japanese people don’t buy much fresh fruit these days. Even cakes topped with strawberries are noticeably more expensive than those without. 

Continue reading “The “Kiwi Brothers” take Japan”

Public Enemy #1: Japan’s Humidity

We’ve just had our first typhoon of the year. Nothing serious, but this entire week has been so bloody humid and wet. This is typical of Japan’s wet season (tsuyu 梅雨) and its the absolutely worst. After living here for four years, I’ve yet to get accustomed to the country’s summer climate. And I don’t think I ever will. From June to September, Japan experiences everything; increasing humidity, heatwaves, tropical storms, typhoons and migrating jellyfish. 

Yesterday was absolute nightmare. The trains were delayed by forty minutes, even though it wasn’t particularly raining hard.  I missed the school bus, which normally gives me a lift up the hill to the school. So I arrived as if I’d just climbed Mt.Fuji and trekked through the Amazon Rainforest ; a sweaty, wet mess. The teacher greeted me with “It’s a bit hot today, right?”, I sarcastically replied with “Ah, no. I’m fine, thanks”.

Continue reading “Public Enemy #1: Japan’s Humidity”